Wireless Security: WEP

Published on 19 October 2020

It’s well known that the WiFi security protocol WEP is broken. It’s been broken for years. However, if we’re writing a series on wireless security we should start at the beginning. Whilst it stands for Wired Equivalent Privacy, it hardly lives up to its name.

WiFi comes under the IEEE 802.11 family. WEP was part of the original standard and was quickly superseded by WPA – WiFi Protected Access.

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Wireless Security: WPA

Published on 19 October 2020

We previously spoke about WiFi security and how utterly broken WEP is. Now it’s time to take a look at WPA and WPA2 bruteforcing. This isn’t the only weakness of these protocols – but weak keys are common.

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Hashcracking with AWS

Published on 19 October 2020

In a previous post, I showed the steps to capture a WPA handshake and crack it using Hashcat. On my tiny travel laptop I achieved 416H/s, which is…slow. AWS offers “GPU Optimized” EC2 instances which can offer a significant speed increases.

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Breaking Enterprise Wireless

Published on 19 October 2020

In our previous posts we discussed how WEP is completely broken, known weaknesses with WPA, and bruteforcing WPA using AWS. This time around it’s time to look at “Enterprise” Wireless security. These are networks protected with EAP – Extensible Authentication Protocol.

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Content Security Policy

Published on 19 October 2020

In our post on Fixing Cross-site Scripting, we recommended the use of Content Security Policy (CSP) to mitigate the effects of this vulnerability. 

It does this by allowing you to set up an allow list of resource locations (such as scripts) for your web pages, and therefore inform the browser to block any scripts that do not come from an authorised source. The problem is, you have to set up an allow list of resource locations, or the resource will be blocked.

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Extracting Domain Hashes: Mimikatz

Published on 14 October 2020

We previously covered how to perform incredibly fast hashcracking with AWS. In this post we’ll take a step back, and look at one simple method to extract the hashes from a domain controller. To be clear, this is a post exploitation step and to perform these steps a domain administrator account will be needed.

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